Sand Mandala Creation

Sep 4th, 2019 - Sep 8th, 2019

Sand Mandala

Created by visiting Tibetan Buddhist Monks

September 4*-8, 2019 (ceremony Sep. 8)

Tibetan Buddhist Monks of  Dzongkar Choede monastery (India) will be in the Stewart Discovery Studio creating a Sand Mandala. Drop-in during our regular gallery hours to observe their work! 

*Due to unforeseen circumstances the sand mandala will start on September 4th not on the 3rd as previously advertised.

There will be a dismantling ceremony on Sunday, September 8th. The time of this ceremony is unknown as it will happen after the monks have completed the sand mandala and ceremonies have come to a close. We cannot give an exact time estimate.

Back in 2012 a Sand Mandala was created by the visiting monks of Dzongkar Choede monastery. We have been informed that 2 of our original guests from 2012 will be returning!

MAG Hours of Visiting
Mon,Tues, Thurs & Fri 10 am - 4:30 pm
Wednesdays 10 am - 8 pm
Weekends & Holidays* 12 pm - 4:30 pm

About Sand Mandalas

"Mandala is a Sanskrit word meaning "world in harmony" and serves as a tool for guiding individuals along the path of enlightenment. Monks begin construction of the sand mandala by consecrating the site with sacred chants and music. Millions of grains of coloured sand are painstakingly laid into place on a flat platform over a period of several days, forming an intricate diagram of the enlightened mind and the ideal world.

The mandala's purpose is to help transform ordinary minds into enlightened ones. The monks then enact the impermanent nature of existence by sweeping up the coloured grains and dispersing them in flowing water to bless and purify the water.

According to Buddhist scripture, sand mandalas transmit postive energies to the environment and to the people who view them..." Taken from Dzongkar Choede Monastery pamphlet.

More info about sand mandalas Ancient History Encyclopedia

brochure Dzongkar choede monastery

 

Photos of the Sand Mandala creation here at the MAG in 2012.

Monks

Buddhist Monks at Red Deer Museum

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